E. SOTTSASS | TSEUI

E. SOTTSASS | TSEUI

Designer

Ettore Sottsass

Manufacturer

Sèvres

Circa

1994

Description

Tseui was the last empress of China (1835-1908). Tseui consists of the elegant combination of three forms and colors. Their geometries and equilibrium evoke the architectural and graphic signature of the iconic Italian artist and the Memphis movement he initiated.

Each part of the piece is hand-crafted on turn-wheels by the master-ceramicists of Sèvres. The depth of the Sèvres colors is obtained through painstaking methods perfected by the French porcelain manufacture; the deep layers of the colors are insufflated in high temperature while the lighter tones are later applied over meticulous layering. Ettore Sottsass visited the Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres in 1993. He created a series of 14 pieces in collaboration with the revered ceramicists, each of which carries the name of a historical woman figure. In 1994, the 14 pieces were exhibited at the Centre Pompidou in Paris as part of a retrospective exhibition. Later in 1996, the artist completed his collaborative series with Sèvres with a set of white porcelain and gilded gold pieces. The body of work resulting from the collaboration between Ettore Sotsass and Sèvres embodies both the porcelain mastery carried on by the centuries-old Manufacture de Sèvres and the iconic designs of the 20th Century Memphis movement.

Materials

Sèvres Porcelain insufflated with Color Pigments and Glazed

Dimensions

Ø 9 x H 7.5 in
Ø 22.86 x H 19 cm

Lead Time

Upon Request

Price

$8,320

E. SOTTSASS | TSEUI
Ettore Sottsass

Ettore Sottsass

Born in Italy in 1917, Ettore Sottsass was an architect and designer known for his large oeuvre that includes furniture, jewelry, glass, lighting, and office design. Founder of the Memphis Group, a collective of designers who brought forth unprecedented designs marked by clashing forms, colors, and haphazard arrangements which have since had an outsized influence on contemporary design.

Drawing inspiration from such movements as Art Deco and Pop Art, Memphis produced and exhibited furniture and objects that were vibrant in color and futuristic in design. Sottsass’ own work was known for its variety, oftentimes incorporating playfulness through ornamentation and color. His Olivetti typewriter (1969), one of his most celebrated designs, made of bright red-orange plastic, was a Pop phenomenon in both its functionality and innovative design.

Ettore Sottsass COLLECTION

E. SOTTSASS | TSEUI E. SOTTSASS | TSEUI  E. SOTTSASS | MESSALINE E. SOTTSASS | MESSALINE 

E. SOTTSASS | TSEUI