COOLER | A. LOOS

COOLER | A. LOOS

Designer

Adolf Loos

Manufacturer

Lobmeyr

Circa

1931

Description

A posthumous addition to Adolf Loos’ iconic glassware design for Lobmeyr, this champagne cooler was reconstructed by contemporary Viennese architects Hubmann & Vass from a small hand-sketched design of Adolf Loos found on the back of a postcard the Wiener Werkstatte design icon had left behind. Left aside in 1931 when Lobmeyr and Adolf Loos collaborated to create his untitled set (TS248), the champagne cooler reflects Loos’ uncompromising interest in essential and simple forms that perform and achieve a function. Each piece is mouth-blown by the master glassmakers of Lobmeyr and each of the diamond-cut bases is meticulously hand-cut and matte polished. Loos’ glass set has become one of the iconic glassware designs of the 20th Century and a staple in Lobmeyr’s ongoing design legacy.

A functional and yet visually appealing design, the polygon-shaped cooler and its diamond-cut base present a surprising optical effect. Loos designed this barware set with his favorite drink in mind, "Feingespritzter" – a mix of soda and Champagne.

Materials

Mouth blown Crystal with hand cut Diamond pattern

Dimensions

Ø 5.7 x H 7.4 in
Ø 17.7 x H 19.2 cm

Lead Time

Upon Request

Price

COOLER | A. LOOS
Adolf Loos

Adolf Loos

Adolf Loos was born on December 10, 1870 in Brünn (Brno), in the Margraviate of Moravia region of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, today the eastern part of the Czech Republic. Son of a German stonemason and sculptor, Loos studied at the Technical University of Dresden in 1890-1893. He left for the United States before completing his study where he stayed for three years.

In 1896 Loos returned to Vienna. Inspired by his journey in the New World, he devoted himself to architecture. In 1898 he was associated briefly with the Vienna Secession. After serving in the First World War, Loos worked as chief architect of the Department of Housing of Vienna in the newly established Austrian Republic. He resigned, disillusioned, in 1922 and emigrated to France. Between 1922 and 1927 Loos lived mostly in Paris and the French Riviera; he returned to Austria in 1928 and lived there intermittently until his death on August 23, 1933.

Loos's interior designs, in which he used fine materials with polished surfaces uninterrupted by moldings, proved a potent inspiration to the architects of the next generation. In his free-standing houses Loos introduced the compact, block-like mass, although he did not subject it to the geometric rigor characteristic of the work of the Internationalists.

But it was in the design of interiors that Loos revealed himself as a first-class architect; the dignity and coziness of his interiors and their deliberate suitability to modern living conditions have rarely been surpassed. In these Loos focused the emphasis on precious materials and the creation of flowing spaces—very similar to those of Frank Lloyd Wright—and also the notion of Raumplan—that is, architectural composition with volumes of space as opposed to two-dimensional planning.

Adolf Loos COLLECTION

TS248 | A. LOOS TS248 | A. LOOS  COOLER | A. LOOS COOLER | A. LOOS 

COOLER | A. LOOS